TUTORIALS

The following four tutorials are finalized by now:

Inverse Computational Spectral Geometry

Presenters:

  • Emanuele Rodola, Sapienza University of Rome
  • Simone Melzi, Sapienza University of Rome
  • Luca Cosmo, Sapienza University of Rome
  • Michael Bronstein, Twitter/Imperial College London
  • Maks Ovsjanikov, LIX, Ecole Polytechnique, IP Paris

Outline:

In the last decades, geometry processing has attracted a growing interest thanks to the wide availability of new devices and software that make 3D digital data available and manipulable to everyone. Typical issues that are faced by geometry processing algorithms include the variety of discrete representations for 3D data (point clouds, polygonal or tet-meshes and voxels), or the type of deformation this data may undergo. Powerful approaches to address these issues come from looking at the spectral decomposition of canonical differential operators, such as the Laplacian, which provides a rich, informative, robust, and invariant representation of the 3D objects. Reasoning about spectral quantities is at the core of spectral geometry , which has enabled unprecedented performance in many tasks of computer graphics (e.g. shape matching with functional maps, shape retrieval, compression, and texture transfer), as well as contributing in opening new directions of research. The focus of this tutorial is on inverse computational spectral geometry. We will offer a different perspective on spectral geometric techniques, supported by recent successful methods in the graphics and 3D vision communities, as well as older, but notoriously overlooked results. Here, the interest shifts from studying the “forward” path typical of spectral geometry pipelines (e.g. computing Laplacian eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given shape) to studying the inverse path (e.g. recovering a shape from given Laplacian eigenvalues, like in the classical “hearing the shape of the drum” problem). As is emblematic of inverse problems, the ill-posed nature of the reverse direction requires additional effort, but the benefits can be quite considerable as showcased on several challenging tasks in graphics and geometry processing. The purpose of the tutorial is to overview the foundations and the current state of the art on inverse computational spectral geometry, to highlight the main benefits of inverse spectral pipelines, as well as their current limitations and future developments in the context of computer graphics. The tutorial is aimed at a wide audience with a basic understanding of geometry processing, and will be accessible and interesting to students, researchers and practitioners from both the academia and the industry.

Syllabus:

  • Introduction: Motivation and historical overview
  • Problem foundations: Shape-from-spectrum as a classical problem in mathematical physics, inverse eigenvalue problems in matrix calculus, shape-from-metric and shape-from-intrinsic operators
  • Background: The forward direction of classical spectral geometry processing
  • Inverse spectral geometry in CG: Motivations, applications, and examples in graphics
  • Computational techniques: Existing approaches based on formulating an optimization problem, numerical methods and machine learning-based techniques
  • Applications: Inverse spectral geometric pipelines addressing practical problems in graphics
  • Open problems and future directions: Main limitations of current approaches, next steps and open problems
  • Conclusions and Q&A

Volumetric Video

Presenters:

  • Eduard Zell, Uni Bonn
  • Andrea Tagliasacchi, Google
  • Anna Hilsmann, Fraunhofer Berlin

Syllabus:

  • A Compact Overview on Volumetric Video
  • Building a volumetric video capture on a low budget and small resources
  • Multi-View Reconstruction Pipeline (e.g., VSENSE, Open3D)
  • Compression (3D and 4D compression)
  • Perception of 3D and 4D Humans: What makes human realistic?
  • Interaction and Mixed 4D Reconstructions
  • Combining Video and 3D Geometry

CUDA and Application to Task-Based Programming

Presenters:

  • Michael Kenzel, DKFI Saarbruecken
  • Bernhard Kerbl, TU Wien
  • Martin Winter, Graz University of Technology
  • Markus Steinberger, Graz University of Technology

Syllabus:

  • Fundamentals of CUDA
    • History of the GPU
    • The CUDA execution model
    • Kernels, grids, blocks and warps
    • Building CUDA applications
    • Debugging and Profiling
    • Common CUDA libraries
  • Understanding the GPU hardware
    • The CUDA memory model
    • Warp scheduling and latency hiding
    • Independent thread scheduling
    • Performance metrics and optimization
    • Basics of PTX and SASS
  • Recent CUDA features and trends
    • Synchronization with independent thread scheduling
    • Graph API
    • Arrival-wait barriers
    • Tensor cores
    • Set-aside L2 cache
    • libcudacxx: a standard library for CUDA
    • Global memory vs. texture memory
    • Shared memory vs. the L1 cache
  • Task-based CUDA programming
    • Programming on different levels of the GPU hierarchy
    • Persistent threads and megakernels
    • Dynamic parallelism and task-queues
    • GPU queues
    • Dynamic memory management
    • Mixed-parallelism usage scenarios: image processing, software rasterization, mesh subdivision, building spatial acceleration structures and more

Visualization and Graphics in Mixed Reality

Presenters:

  • Denis Kalkofen, Graz University of Technology
  • Shohei Mori, Graz University of Technology
  • Markus Tatzgern, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences

Outline:

This tutorial will present the challenges and unique aspects of mixed reality visualization applications such as organization of data for visualization, real-world data sources for visualization, real time photo-realistic rendering techniques, diminished reality rendering techniques and cognitive and perceptual issues. We are also interested in ways that the existing body of research in the graphics and visualization community can be applied in this research area. We expect the tutorial to be a working event with both presentation of state-of- the-art followed by lively discussion about the key issues and challenges in this research area. Our tutorial is open both for academia and industry, and expected to be a community hub for both areas that are interested in an introduction to the unique challenges of mixed reality visualization. We welcome a diverse audience consisting of students, researchers and developers that have a basic understanding of computer graphics and computer vision.

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